Volume 6, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 368-372
Attitude Towards Infant Feeding Among Health Workers in Calabar, Nigeria
Ikobah Joanah Moses, Department of Paediatrics, University of Calabar/University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
Omoronyia Ogban, Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
Ikpeme Offiong, Department of Paediatrics, University of Calabar/University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
Ekpeyong Nnete, Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
Utsu Caleb, Department of Community Medicine, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
Received: Aug. 16, 2020;       Accepted: Aug. 26, 2020;       Published: Sep. 7, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200603.43      View  87      Downloads  35
Abstract
Background: Effective practice of recommended infant feeding methods is key to child survival strategy in sub-Saharan Africa. Attitude towards infant feeding has been shown to be a significant determinant of practice. For health workers, attitude may determine the propensity to counsel mothers towards adoption and adherence to recommended infant feeding practices. This study aimed at assessing health workers’ attitude towards infant feeding. Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out in April 2019. Leslie Kish formula was used to recruit 225 health workers in Calabar to participate in the study. Ethical approval was obtained from the Cross River State Research and Health Ethics Committee. A validated self-administered IOWA infant feeding attitude scale was utilized in this study. Using the scale, attitude was categorized as positive for breastfeeding, neutral, and positive for formula feeding. Data was analysed using SPSS version 21.0, and p-value was set at 0.05. Result: Two hundred and twenty-five respondents completed the questionnaire. Female: male ratio was 1:0.24, the commonest age group (43.1%) was 31 to 40 years old, and 60% of respondents were nurses. Most respondents (52.9%) had neutral attitude, while 44.0% had positive attitude for breastfeeding, and 3.1% had positive attitude towards formula feeding. Age group, religion, profession, and ethnicity did not significantly influence attitude towards breastfeeding (p>0.05). Conclusion: Neutral attitude towards breastfeeding was common among health workers. This has implications for successful implementation of the recommended breastfeeding initiative towards improvement in child survival especially in resource-poor settings. Regular re-training of health workers is needed, especially through continuing educational effort by the various health professional bodies.
Keywords
Infant Feeding, Child Survival, Health Workers Attitude, Nigeria
To cite this article
Ikobah Joanah Moses, Omoronyia Ogban, Ikpeme Offiong, Ekpeyong Nnete, Utsu Caleb, Attitude Towards Infant Feeding Among Health Workers in Calabar, Nigeria, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2020, pp. 368-372. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200603.43
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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